Second Life Thailand Project


Program Overview

The Plastic Waste Reduction Program (Plastic Program) enables the robust impact assessment of new or scaled-up waste collection and recycling projects.

Only a fraction of the more than 350 million tons of plastic used each year is recycled. This plastic waste has become a critical concern to companies, governments, and consumers around the world. However, without new incentives it will be challenging to scale up waste collection and recycling to the levels needed to reduce the use of virgin material and keep significant amounts of plastic from entering the environment, especially the world’s oceans.

The Plastic Program is used for consistent accounting and crediting of a variety of plastic collection and recycling activities. It drives investment to projects that increase the collection and/or recycling of plastic waste. The program enables the independent auditing of projects to determine the extent to which they have reduced plastic waste. The program issues credits based on the volume of plastic collected and/or recycled above baseline rates (i.e., what would have happened in the absence of the project activity). This “plastic crediting mechanism” provides an efficient and powerful means of financing activities that verifiably reduce plastic in the environment anywhere in the world.

The 3R Initiative, of which Verra is a founding member, conceptualized and supported the development of the Plastic Program.


The Role of Plastic Credits


Types of Plastic Credits

collection board and dip net in egypt

Waste Collection Credits

Verra issues Waste Collection Credits (WCCs) based on the volume of plastic waste collected and appropriately managed above what would have happened in the absence of the Plastic Program project.

By purchasing WCCs, organizations directly contribute to collecting plastic waste from nature and establishing systems to prevent further pollution.

Waste Recycling Credits

Verra issues Waste Recycling Credits (WRCs) based on the volume of plastic waste recycled above what would have happened in the absence of the Plastic Program project.

By purchasing WRCs, organizations help scale recycling infrastructure and generate recycled plastic feedstock that can replace virgin plastic.


How It Works

Projects developed under the Plastic Program follow a rigorous assessment process to be certified. The Plastic Program covers a diverse range of activities including waste collection from the environment, development of new municipal infrastructure, the collection and sorting of recyclable plastic waste, and the development of new recycling technologies and/or the scaling up of existing ones.

The robustness of the Plastic Program is supported by four key components:

PLASTIC STANDARD

The Plastic Waste Reduction Standard (PDF) lays out the rules and requirements that all projects must follow in order to be certified.

INDEPENDENT AUDITING

All Plastic Program projects are subject to desk and field audits by qualified independent third-party auditors and Verra staff to ensure that they meet standards and apply methodologies properly.

ACCOUNTING METHODOLOGIES

Projects are assessed using a technically sound plastic waste collection or recycling quantification methodology specific to that project type.

REGISTRY SYSTEM

The Verra Registry is the central storehouse of data on all registered projects and will track the generation, retirement, and cancellation of all Plastic Credits. To register with the program, projects must show that they have met all standards and methodological requirements.

See Recent Plastics News


Starting a Plastic Project: What to Expect

Looking to develop a project using the Plastic Standard? This section outlines important information you should know before you begin.

1. Before You Begin

Before designing a Plastic Program project, please keep in mind:

  • The scope of the Plastic Standard Program is currently limited to plastic waste collection and recycling activities.
  • Reuse or reduction activities are not eligible to issue Plastic Credits.
  • Projects can be developed anywhere in the world and may include any of the seven types of plastic, plus composite materials that include plastic.

Review the Develop a Project under Verra’s Plastic Program: A Quick Guide to familiarize yourself with the project development and registration process.


Please note that Verra staff cannot assist you with the development of a project. We can only respond to questions related to our rules and requirements. Some projects may decide to engage a developer or consultant to assist with the project development process.

2. Fees and Finances

Plastic project development costs vary depending on the circumstances and fall into three categories:

  • Verra fees as outlined in the Plastic Program Fee Schedule.
  • Project development fees include project development and operations, monitoring, and consultants fees.
  • Auditing fees payable directly to the VVB.

As a standard-setting body, Verra does not track external costs (project development and auditing fees).

3. Timelines

There are two timelines project proponents need to be aware of before starting to develop a plastic project: 1) the timeline for project registration, and 2) the timeline for Plastic Credit issuance.

1. Timeline for Project Registration

After a project proponent develops a project description, a project undergoes a 30-day public comment period. After this, the project goes through validation, during which a validation/verification body (VVB) carefully reviews all comments received during the public comment period and all project details.

After a successful validation, the project proponent requests project registration with Verra and undergoes project review as outlined in the Plastic Program Guide.

The length of the validation and registration process, which includes Verra’s review, varies from project to project and can take up to a year.

2. Timeline for Plastic Credit Issuance

Before a project can be issued Plastic Credits, the following steps need to be completed:

  1. Project activities need to be implemented and monitored and the plastic waste collected and/or recycled needs to be quantified;
  2. A validation/verification body (VVB) to verify the collection and/or recycling activities; and
  3. Verra needs to approve the verification.

Upon successful verification, the project can request Plastic Credit issuance via the Verra Registry.

4. Next Steps

Once a project is registered and has issued Plastic Credits, the project proponent can sell these credits on the open market.


As a mission-driven, non-profit standard-setter Verra maintains an impartial position in the marketplace and does not buy, sell, or trade Plastic Credits. Any negotiations and purchase agreements between the project developers and the buyers are established outside the Verra Registry.

Plastic at a glance

  • 40+

    Projects listed on the registry

    Program Badge
  • 3M+

    tonnes of plastic waste estimated to be collected or recycled

    Program Badge
  • 15+

    countries with Plastic Credit projects

    Program Badge

Frequently Asked Questions

Jump to topic


The Plastic Standard sets out requirements for new or scaled-up collection and recycling projects that can quantify their impact in a credible, transparent and consistent way to generate Plastic Credits. The projects must meet stringent requirements, including social and environmental safeguards. Credits are issued for the additional amount of plastic waste that has been collected from the environment and managed in a responsible manner (e.g., recycled, landfilled or incinerated with energy recovery) or for any plastic recycled beyond a baseline recycling rate.

Any company looking to mitigate its plastic footprint beyond its own value chain can purchase Plastic Credits. The revenue from credit sales enables projects to continue or scale-up their collection and/or recycling activities.

The Plastic Standard will help create a more circular economy involving companies, NGOs, governments, recycling companies, infrastructure investors, energy companies and waste pickers.

It will incentivize the additional collection and recycling of plastic waste; improve working conditions, safety and livelihoods of waste pickers, collectors and sorters; and spur companies to reduce the amount of virgin plastic used in their value chains. Ultimately, the Plastic Standard will increase transparency and uniformity in the accounting of plastic waste collection and recycling activities.

Companies can use the Plastic Standard to assess the impact of new waste collection and recycling projects or investments, stimulate the increased availability of recycled plastic feedstocks in key packaging production regions, and reduce supply chain risk by ensuring social inclusiveness through increased wages and safe working conditions in the waste collection, sorting and processing industries.

The Plastic Standard can benefit governments by incentivizing voluntary investment and action in new and expanded collection and recycling projects to meet or complement municipal and regional waste management needs. It also allows regulators to bring projects using the Plastic Standard into their extended producer responsibility schemes and jumpstart programs with a suite of high-performing projects.

The Plastic Standard is owned and operated by Verra.

Projects that measurably increase the collection and/or recycling of waste plastic above baseline rates. Creditable activities include but are not limited to: community waste collection from the environment; collection and sorting of recyclable plastic waste; new or expanded waste collection infrastructure development; and new or expanded recycling infrastructure development.

Most of the credited collection activities will be located in economies dependent on “informal” waste management, where the waste collection projects will need to ensure that local waste picker communities are involved in an inclusive and beneficial way.

Waste pickers and other informal collectors can generate Plastic Credits – Waste Collection Credits and Waste Recycling Credits – by increasing the amount of waste they collect and sort for recycling. The sale of these Plastic Credits (e.g., by individuals or cooperatives) provides additional income for collectors. The revenues generated from the sale of Plastic Credits can help set up and professionalize social businesses that provide the needed raw materials to recycling processors, and the Plastic Standard includes social and environmental safeguards to ensure that all participating waste pickers/collectors have safe working conditions and improved livelihoods. In addition, Plastic Credits associated with projects that generate social benefits (e.g., increased wages; safe and secure work environment; access to education) for waste pickers and other marginalized or vulnerable communities can be labeled as such. This enables buyers of Plastic Credits to identify and prioritize projects with exceptional social value if desired, thereby increasing the flow of funds to these communities.

A Plastic Credit represents one tonne of collected or recycled plastic waste, certified to the Plastic Standard. They are sold to companies that have done everything they can to reduce their plastic footprint in their operations and the money is used to invest in projects that help collect and recycle plastic waste to further reduce their plastic footprint. The projects must meet stringent requirements, including social and environmental safeguards. Credits are issued for the additional amount of plastic waste that has been collected from the environment and managed in a responsible manner (e.g., recycled, landfilled or incinerated with energy recovery) or for any plastic recycled that goes beyond a baseline recycling rate.

Two types of Plastic Credits can be verified under the Plastic Standard. A Waste Collection Credit is awarded for the additional amount of plastic waste collected from the environment and managed in a responsible manner (e.g., recycled, landfilled or incinerated with energy recovery). A Waste Recycling Credit is awarded for any recycled plastic waste that goes beyond a baseline recycling rate. Plastic Credits are issued with a serial number identifier to designate the material type collected (where possible) or recycled.

The collection and recycling of plastic waste is accounted for and/or credited in the same way regardless of where the project is located. Companies are encouraged to purchase Plastic Credits from projects in their key production regions and/or markets, linking to where the plastic leakage is occurring and/or where there is greatest potential for waste reduction and/or establishing transformative circular economy models. Plastic Credits have a geographic market identifier as part of their serial number.

The price of Plastic Credits will vary based on characteristics of the project from which they are issued (e.g., collection vs. recycling, location, material type, social impact). One credit represents one tonne of collected or recycled plastic waste.

Plastic Credits can be labeled with additional certifications, for example, a certification for the project’s social and environmental co-benefits (e.g., increased wages, reduced marine pollution). In other markets, additional certifications often increase the value of the credit.

The Plastic Standard includes methodologies for plastic waste collection and recycling with procedures for demonstrating that only new or additional project activities are credited and quantifying credible accounting project baselines. Project baselines must be adjusted periodically (e.g., every seven years during crediting period renewal) to reflect the new, increased collection and recycling rates in the region, raising the bar for the future issuance of Plastic Credits.

Companies looking to mitigate the parts of their plastic footprints that cannot be addressed through direct (internal and supply chain) actions are expected to be the major buyers of Plastic Credits. If desired, companies can invest in outside projects and/or purchase and retire sufficient volumes of Plastic Credits to help them achieve their plastic stewardship commitments.

The Plastic Standard can be used to transparently and credibly quantify the waste reduction benefits and enable standardized impact comparisons between projects. Therefore, companies not interested in credits can still use the Plastic Standard to assess the quality, effectiveness and social value/safeguards of projects they are developing or supporting.

If a company’s commitments and claims about plastic stewardship are not explicit, clear and independently verifiable, they represent a reputational risk. A wide variety of terms related to corporate plastic stewardship, such as ‘Plastic Neutral’ and ‘One In, One Out’, are already in use, and many more will evolve over time. Regardless of commitments, transparency of the concepts involved in any claim is crucial to credibly communicating leadership.

Companies can retire Plastic Credits verified to the rules and requirements of the Plastic Standard to compensate for the parts of their plastic leakage that cannot yet be eliminated, demonstrating progress toward achieving commitments around plastic waste reduction. The Guidelines set out three commitments related to plastic waste and circularity that Waste Collection Credits and Waste Reduction Credits can contribute to: Net Zero Plastic Leakage, Net 100% Recycled at End-of-Life and Net Circular Plastic.

The Plastic Standard can help jumpstart EPR schemes with proven waste reduction projects and a robust framework to assess various EPR initiatives/activities. Regulators could offer companies subject to the EPR requirements the ability to use Plastic Credits in lieu of paying EPR fees, providing an efficient transfer of resources from covered entities directly to projects that help collect and recycle plastic waste that reduces the government’s administrative burden. This potential model is analogous to how some national regulators (e.g., in Colombia and South Africa) allow covered companies to surrender units certified under the Verified Carbon Standard Program (Verified Carbon Units (VCUs)) in lieu of paying a carbon tax.

Plastic Credits can efficiently and effectively support the long-term implementation of waste reduction commitments and obligations. In the near term, plastic crediting will help corporate leaders reduce potential negative externalities associated with their plastic footprints and catalyze investment in new waste collection and recycling efforts. Over the longer-term, even with aggressive internal and supply chain actions, there will be some uncontrollable plastic leakage from a company’s value chain, which plastic crediting could mitigate. The mechanism will evolve over time. It will be used for voluntary commitments in the short term and may eventually become institutionalized, including potentially in regulatory regimes, changing its character in the longer term.

Similar to the role played by carbon credits, plastic crediting will catalyze and support voluntary company commitments to reduce waste and pollution through internal and supply chain actions, along with the use of the market mechanism to mitigate the part of a company’s plastic footprint that cannot be tackled directly. A Plastic Credit is like a carbon credit. They are purchased by companies that have done everything they can to reduce their plastic footprint in their operations and the money is used to invest in projects that help collect and recycle plastic waste to further mitigate their plastic footprint. The projects must meet stringent standards. Credits are certified for the additional volumes of plastic waste that have been collected from the environment and managed in a responsible manner (e.g., recycled, landfilled or incinerated with energy recovery) or for any plastic recycled that goes beyond a baseline recycling rate.

Yes. The Guidelines encourage companies to assess their plastic footprint and implement activities to reduce it within their value chain as a first priority. Only once opportunities for direct actions have been identified should a company use Plastic Credits to compensate for its unavoidable plastic leakage.

This prioritization helps companies take meaningful actions to reduce the environmental impact of their packaging, including reducing total plastic use and the potential for waste through redesign and using recycled content where plastic cannot be eliminated. It also allows companies to take full responsibility for the plastic waste that they cannot eliminate through the purchase of Plastic Credits. Ideally, those Plastic Credits would match in material type and geography to the company’s leaked plastic.

Greenwashing occurs when disinformation or ineffective actions are presented by a company to create a positive environmental public image. The Guidelines can be used to account, assess and transparently report on the effectiveness of waste reduction actions and any associated claims that companies make regarding the mitigation of their plastic footprints.

The Guidelines substantiate potential waste reduction claims by companies, including providing rules for robust accounting of company plastic footprints, defining how companies must aggressively reduce their footprints (including through recycled/recyclable content and value chain investments) and establishing when and how Plastic Credits can be used to credibly mitigate potential leakage that companies cannot tackle themselves.

The Plastic Standard ensures that projects are only credited to the extent they generate a verifiable increase in the collection or recycling of plastic waste that would not have occurred without the revenues from credit purchases. The Plastic Program Guide sets out requirements for claims made about projects that use the Plastic Standard and Plastic Credits verified under that program.

The Plastic Standard is the only standard that mandates that credits only represent the activity of additional (i.e., beyond business as usual) plastic waste collection and recycling. Other standards either do not require action beyond business as usual or certify/issue credits for the material (e.g., recycled content, ocean bound plastic). For the most part, organizations that currently credit the activity of collection or recycling plan to use the Plastic Standard when it is launched.

The Plastic Standard was developed with the support of the Plastic Standard Development Committee, which includes organizations with existing projects, such as Plastic Bank, rePurpose and Project STOP as well as others working directly with companies (Lonely Whale), and the companies themselves that are engaged across many different initiatives in this space (Dow, Mars). Through this committee and the 3RI pilot projects, we are seeing activities on the ground and global brands come together around the Plastic Standard as a credible and robust international certification.

The Guidelines are the first integrated framework incorporating best practices for achieving and reporting on goals to collect and recycle plastic. The 3RI, EA, South Pole and Quantis referred to the Plastic Leak Project, the most advanced plastic leakage assessment framework, WWF’s ReSource: Plastic initiative, and the work of, among others, the International Union for the Conservation of Nature, Ellen MacArthur Foundation, United Nations Environment Programme and World Business Council for Sustainable Development to support the development of the Guidelines.

The 3R (Reduce, Recover, Recycle) Initiative (3RI) brings together companies and NGOs committed to achieving zero plastic waste. The 3RI catalyzes corporate leadership to reduce plastic waste through internal and supply chain actions, and supports collection and/or recycling projects to mitigate plastic waste that a company cannot address directly. Its members conceptualized a standard for plastic crediting and supported the development of Verra’s Plastic Waste Reduction Standard. The 3RI also helped conceptualize and develop the Guidelines for Corporate Plastic Stewardship. Please visit the 3R Initiative website for further information.

The Guidelines are the first integrated framework to comprise combined best practices for standardized accounting and reporting of plastic footprints, footprint mitigation methods and commitments to reducing plastic waste and achieving circularity. The Guidelines were developed by the 3RI, South Pole, Quantis and EA. For more information, please visit the 3R Initiative website.

En español

<span lang=”es”>El Estándar de Plástico establece los requisitos que deben cumplir los proyectos de recolección y reciclaje, bien sean nuevos o ampliados, que buscan cuantificar su impacto de una manera fiable, transparente y consistente para generar créditos de plástico. Los proyectos deben dar cuenta del cumplimiento de estrictos requerimientos, incluyendo las salvaguardas sociales y ambientales. Asimismo, los créditos se emiten dependiendo de la cantidad adicional de residuos plásticos que han sido recolectados del medio ambiente y gestionados de manera responsable (por ejemplo, siendo reciclados, depositados en vertederos o incinerados para la recuperación de energía) o de la cantidad de material reciclado que supere las tasas de reciclaje de una línea base.</span>

<span lang=”es”>Cualquier empresa que busque mitigar su huella de plástico más allá de su propia cadena de valor puede adquirir créditos de plástico. Los ingresos obtenidos por las ventas de los créditos permiten que los proyectos continúen o amplíen sus actividades de recolección y/o reciclaje.</span>

El Estándar de Plástico ayudará a crear una economía más circular en la que participen empresas, ONG, gobiernos, empresas de reciclaje, inversionistas en infraestructura, empresas de energía y recicladores.

Incentivará la adicionalidad de la recolección y el reciclaje de residuos plásticos; mejorará las condiciones de trabajo, la seguridad y los medios de vida de los recicladores, recolectores y clasificadores; y estimulará la reducción de la cantidad de plástico virgen utilizado en las cadenas de valor de las empresas. En última instancia, el Estándar de Plástico aumentará la transparencia y uniformidad en la contabilidad de las actividades de recolección y reciclaje de residuos plásticos.

El Estándar de Plástico puede beneficiar a los gobiernos al incentivar la inversión y acción voluntarias en proyectos de recolección y reciclaje, bien sean nuevos o ampliados, con el fin de satisfacer o complementar las necesidades de gestión de desechos municipales y regionales. También permite a los reguladores incorporar proyectos que utilizan el Estándar de Plástico en sus esquemas de Responsabilidad Extendida del Productor y poner en marcha programas conformados por un conjunto de proyectos de alto desempeño.

Verra es el propietario y operador del Estándar de Plástico.

Proyectos que aumenten considerablemente la recolección y/o el reciclaje de residuos plásticos, por encima de las tasas de una cierta línea base. Las actividades acreditables incluyen, entre otras, la recolección comunitaria de residuos del medio ambiente, recolección y clasificación de residuos plásticos reciclables, desarrollo de infraestructura nueva o ampliada para la recolección de residuos y desarrollo de infraestructura nueva o ampliada para el reciclaje.

La mayoría de las actividades de recolección aceptadas por el Estándar de Plástico se ubicarán en economías que dependen de la gestión “informal” de residuos, y será obligatorio para los proyectos de recolección garantizar la participación inclusiva y beneficiosa de las comunidades locales de recicladores.

Los recicladores y otros recolectores informales pueden generar créditos de plástico (créditos de recolección de residuos y créditos de reciclaje de residuos) al aumentar la cantidad de desechos recolectados y clasificados para su reciclaje. La venta de estos créditos de plástico (por ejemplo, por parte de individuos o cooperativas) proporciona ingresos adicionales para los recolectores, pudiendo ayudar a establecer y profesionalizar empresas sociales que brinden las materias primas necesarias a los procesadores de reciclaje. Además, el Estándar de Plástico incluye salvaguardas sociales y ambientales para garantizar que todos los recicladores o recolectores de residuos participantes tengan condiciones de trabajo seguras y mejores medios de vida.

Igualmente, los créditos de plástico asociados a proyectos que generan beneficios sociales (por ejemplo, aumento de salarios, ambientes seguros de trabajo y acceso a la educación) para los recicladores y otras comunidades marginadas o vulnerables pueden atribuirse dichos impactos positivos. Esto permite a los compradores de créditos de plástico identificar y priorizar proyectos con un valor social excepcional si así lo desean, aumentando el flujo de fondos para las comunidades respectivas.

Un crédito representa una tonelada de residuos plásticos recolectada o reciclada y certificada por el Estándar de Plástico. Estos créditos se venden a empresas que han hecho todo lo posible para reducir la huella de plástico en sus operaciones y el dinero se utiliza para invertir en proyectos que ayudan a recolectar y reciclar residuos plásticos para reducir su huella aun más. Los proyectos deben cumplir con estrictos requerimientos, incluyendo las salvaguardas sociales y ambientales. Asimismo, los créditos se emiten dependiendo de la cantidad adicional de residuos plásticos que han sido recolectados del medio ambiente y gestionados de manera responsable (por ejemplo, siendo reciclados, depositados en vertederos o incinerados para la recuperación de energía) o de la cantidad de material reciclado que supere las tasas de reciclaje de una línea base.

Se pueden verificar dos tipos de créditos ante el Estándar de Plástico. En el primero, se otorga un crédito de recolección de residuos por la cantidad adicional de desechos plásticos recolectados del medio ambiente y gestionados de manera responsable (por ejemplo, al haber sido reciclados, depositados en vertederos o incinerados para la recuperación de energía). Por otro lado, se otorga un crédito de reciclaje de residuos por cualquier residuo plástico reciclado que supere la tasa de reciclaje de la línea base. Los créditos de plástico se emiten con un número de serie que identifica y designa el tipo de material recolectado (cuando sea posible) o reciclado.

La recolección y el reciclaje de residuos plásticos se contabiliza y/o acredita de la misma forma, independientemente de dónde se ubique el proyecto. Se invita a las empresas a comprar créditos de plástico provenientes de proyectos ubicados en sus regiones o mercados de producción clave, vinculándose al lugar donde se está produciendo la fuga de plástico o donde existe un mayor potencial de reducción de residuos y/o estableciendo modelos transformadores de economía circular. Los créditos de plástico tienen un identificador geográfico como parte de su número de serie.

El precio de los créditos de plástico variará según las características del proyecto a partir del cual son emitidos (por ejemplo, dependiendo de si es de recolección o reciclaje, su ubicación, el tipo de material y los impactos sociales). Un crédito representa una tonelada de residuos plásticos recogida o reciclada.

Los créditos de plástico pueden recibir etiquetas o certificaciones adicionales, por ejemplo, de los cobeneficios sociales y ambientales del proyecto (al producir un aumento de salarios o la reducción de la contaminación marina, entre otros). En algunos mercados, las certificaciones adicionales suelen aumentar el valor del crédito.

El Estándar de Plástico incluye metodologías para la recolección y el reciclaje de residuos plásticos, así como procedimientos para demostrar que solo se acreditan las actividades nuevas o adicionales y cuantificar la línea base del proyecto de forma creíble. Las líneas base deben ajustarse periódicamente (por ejemplo, cada siete años, durante la renovación del período de generación de créditos) para reflejar las nuevas y mayores tasas de recolección y reciclaje en la región, elevando el umbral para la futura emisión de créditos de plástico.

Se espera que las empresas que buscan mitigar aquellas partes de sus huellas de plástico que no se pueden abordar mediante acciones directas (internas y en la cadena de suministro) sean los principales compradores de créditos de plástico. Si así lo desean, las empresas pueden invertir en proyectos externos y/o comprar y retirar volúmenes suficientes de créditos para lograr sus compromisos de gestión del plástico.

El Estándar de Plástico se puede utilizar para cuantificar de forma transparente y creíble los beneficios de la reducción de residuos y permitir comparaciones estandarizadas sobre los impactos de los proyectos. Por lo tanto, incluso las empresas que no estén interesadas en adquirir créditos pueden utilizar el Estándar de Plástico para evaluar la calidad, efectividad y valor social/salvaguardas de los proyectos que están desarrollando o apoyando.

Si los compromisos y las declaraciones de una empresa sobre su gestión del plástico no son explícitos, claros y verificables de forma independiente, representan un riesgo reputacional. En la actualidad, se utiliza una amplia variedad de términos relacionados con la gestión corporativa del plástico, como “neutral en plástico” y “uno dentro, uno fuera”, y muchos otros evolucionarán con el tiempo. Más allá de los compromisos, la transparencia de los conceptos utilizados en cualquier declaración resulta crucial para comunicar el liderazgo de una empresa de manera fiable.

Las empresas pueden retirar los créditos que han sido verificados según las reglas y los requerimientos del Estándar de Plástico, de modo que les sea posible compensar las partes de sus fugas de plástico que aún no se pueden remover, demostrando un progreso hacia el logro de compromisos de reducción de residuos. Las Directrices establecen tres compromisos relacionados con los residuos y la circularidad a la que pueden contribuir los créditos de recolección de residuos y los créditos de reducción de residuos: fugas netas de plástico cero, 100% reciclado neto al final de la vida útil y plástico circular neto.

El Estándar de Plástico puede ayudar a impulsar los esquemas de REP mediante proyectos probados de reducción de residuos y un marco sólido para evaluar diversas iniciativas o actividades. Los reguladores podrían ofrecer a las empresas sujetas a los requisitos de REP la posibilidad de usar créditos de plástico en lugar de pagar tarifas vigentes, proporcionando una transferencia eficiente y directa de recursos de las entidades cubiertas a proyectos que ayudan a recolectar y reciclar residuos plásticos y reducen la carga administrativa del gobierno. Este modelo propuesto es análogo al utilizado por algunos reguladores nacionales (como Colombia y Sudáfrica), de acuerdo con el cual se permite a las empresas cubiertas entregar unidades certificadas ante el Programa Verified Carbon Standard (Unidades Verificadas de Carbono –VCU–) en lugar de pagar un impuesto al carbono.

Los créditos de plástico pueden respaldar de manera eficiente y efectiva el cumplimiento, a largo plazo, de los compromisos y las obligaciones de reducción de residuos. A corto plazo, la generación de créditos de plástico ayudará a los líderes corporativos a reducir las posibles externalidades negativas asociadas a sus huellas de plástico y a catalizar la inversión en nuevos esfuerzos de recolección y reciclaje de residuos. A largo plazo, incluso a pesar de tomar acciones radicales internas y en las cadenas de suministro, las empresas tendrán algunas fugas de plástico incontrolables que estos créditos podrían mitigar. El mecanismo evolucionará con el tiempo, pues se utilizará para cumplir con compromisos voluntarios a corto plazo y finalmente podría institucionalizarse, incluso en sistemas regulatorios.

De manera similar al papel que juegan los créditos de carbono, la generación de créditos de plástico catalizará y respaldará los compromisos voluntarios de reducción de los residuos y la contaminación mediante acciones internas y en la cadena de suministro de las empresas. Para ello, se hará uso del mecanismo de mercado que permite mitigar la porción de la huella de plástico de una empresa que no puede ser abordada directamente.

Un crédito de plástico es como un crédito de carbono, en tanto puede ser comprado por empresas que han hecho todo lo posible para reducir la huella de plástico en sus operaciones y el dinero se utiliza para invertir en proyectos que ayudan a recolectar y reciclar residuos, mitigando aun más dicha huella. Los proyectos deben cumplir con estrictos estándares y los créditos se certifican en función de los volúmenes adicionales de residuos plásticos que han sido recolectados del medio ambiente y gestionados de manera responsable (por ejemplo, al ser reciclados, depositados en vertederos o incinerados para la recuperación de energía) o de la cantidad de material reciclado que supere las tasas de reciclaje de una línea base.

Sí. Las Directrices animan a las empresas a evaluar sus huellas de plástico e implementar actividades para reducirla dentro de su cadena de valor, como primera prioridad. Únicamente luego de haber identificado oportunidades para implementar acciones directas, una empresa podrá utilizar créditos de plástico para compensar su fuga inevitable de plástico.

Esta priorización ayuda a las empresas a tomar medidas significativas para reducir el impacto ambiental de sus envases, incluyendo la reducción total del uso de plástico y del potencial de desperdicio mediante el rediseño y el uso de contenido reciclado cuando no se puede prescindir del plástico. También permite a las empresas asumir la plena responsabilidad de los residuos plásticos que no pueden eliminar mediante la compra de créditos de plástico. Idealmente, estos deberían coincidir con el tipo de material y la ubicación geográfica de donde proviene la fuga de plástico de la empresa.

El greenwashing ocurre cuando una empresa presenta información errada o acciones ineficaces para crear una imagen pública ambiental positiva. Las Directrices pueden utilizarse para contabilizar, evaluar y reportar de forma transparente la eficacia de las acciones de reducción de residuos y cualquier declaración asociada que hagan las empresas con respecto a la mitigación de sus huellas de plástico.

Las Directrices son el fundamento de las declaraciones de reducción de residuos que puedan hacer las empresas, ya que proporcionan reglas para la contabilidad sólida de sus huellas de plástico, definen la forma en que estas deben reducirse drásticamente (por ejemplo, mediante contenido reciclado/reciclable e inversiones en la cadena de valor) y establecen cuándo y cómo los créditos de plástico pueden ser utilizados para mitigar de manera fiable posibles aquellas fugas que las empresas no pueden abordar por sí mismas.

El Estándar de Plástico asegura que los proyectos solo sean acreditados en la medida en que generen un aumento verificable en la recolección o el reciclaje de residuos plásticos, el cual no se habría producido sin los ingresos por la compra de los créditos. La Guía del Programa de Plástico establece los requerimientos para hacer declaraciones sobre proyectos que utilizan el Estándar de Plástico y los créditos de plástico verificados ante este programa.

El Estándar de Plástico es el único estándar que exige que los créditos solo representen la adicionalidad de la actividad de recolección y reciclaje de residuos plásticos (es decir, que vaya más allá del escenario típico). Otros estándares no demandan la adicionalidad o certifican/emiten créditos por el material (por ejemplo, contenido reciclado o plástico con destino al océano). En su mayoría, las organizaciones que actualmente acreditan la actividad de recolección o reciclaje planean utilizar el Estándar de Plástico una vez este sea lanzado.

El Estándar de Plástico fue desarrollado con el apoyo de un Comité de Desarrollo, el cual está conformado por organizaciones con proyectos existentes, como Plastic Bank, rePurpose y Project STOP, así como otras que trabajan directamente con empresas (Lonely Whale) y empresas que están comprometidas en numerosas iniciativas de este tipo (Dow, Mars). Por medio de este comité y los proyectos piloto de 3RI, estamos viendo cómo actividades de campo y marcas globales se unen en torno al Estándar de Plástico al reconocer en este una certificación internacional confiable y sólida.

Las Directrices son el primer marco integrado que incorpora las mejores prácticas para alcanzar y reportar los objetivos de recolección y reciclaje de plástico. La 3RI, EA, South Pole y Quantis se refirieron al Plastic Leak Project como el marco de evaluación de fugas de plástico más avanzado. ReSource, la iniciativa de plástico de WWF y el trabajo de, entre otros, la Unión Internacional para la Conservación de la Naturaleza, la Fundación Ellen MacArthur, El Programa de las Naciones Unidas para el Medio Ambiente y el Consejo Empresarial Mundial para el Desarrollo Sostenible apoyarán el desarrollo de las Directrices.

La Iniciativa 3R (Reducir, Recuperar, Reciclar) agrupa empresas y ONG comprometidas con la eliminación de los residuos plásticos en su totalidad. 3RI (como también se le conoce) acelera el liderazgo de las empresas al reducir los residuos plásticos mediante acciones internas y en sus cadenas de suministro, y apoya proyectos de recolección y/o reciclaje para mitigar los desechos que no se pueden abordar directamente. En consecuencia, sus miembros conceptualizaron un estándar para la generación de créditos de plástico y apoyaron el desarrollo del Plastic Waste Reduction Standard de Verra. El 3RI también ayudó a conceptualizar y desarrollar las Directrices para la gestión corporativa del plástico. Visite el sitio web de la Iniciativa 3R para obtener más información.

Las Directrices son el primer marco que abarca de forma integrada las mejores prácticas para la contabilidad estandarizada y el reporte de las huellas de plástico, métodos de mitigación de las huellas y compromisos para reducir los residuos plásticos y lograr la circularidad. Las Directrices fueron desarrolladas por 3RI, South Pole, Quantis y EA. Para obtener más información, visite el sitio web de la Iniciativa 3R.