Announcements

Verra Response to Guardian Article on Carbon Offsets Used by Major Airlines

Para leer en español haga click aquí.

Verra firmly disputes the Guardian article published on 4 May 2021 about several rainforest preservation projects, the companies supporting them, and the Verified Carbon Standard. The article exhibits clear bias as well as substantive errors that betray ignorance about how carbon crediting works, and fails to acknowledge the role of such projects in channeling finance to save the world’s rainforests. 

Over the past few months, we have had an ongoing email exchange with the Guardian and Greenpeace reporters. Below we share the messages that were sent to the journalists. 


14 April 2021: Open Response

THIS “JOURNALISM” FROM THE GUARDIAN AND GREENPEACE THREATENS FOREST CONSERVATION

An upcoming article in The Guardian criticizing six rainforest preservation projects (out of a total of 77 that we oversee) and the companies that have supported these projects is deeply flawed. As it has been related to us, the Guardian article exhibits clear bias, is riddled with substantive errors that betray ignorance about how carbon offset credits work, and utterly fails to accurately account for the vital role of such projects in channeling much needed finance for the preservation of tropical forests. Unfortunately, this unfair, one-sided and inaccurate article undermines efforts to save the world’s rainforests.

The article is a product of a collaboration between The Guardian and the Unearthed house organ of Greenpeace, which has made no secret of its opposition to carbon offset credits. As such, it should come as no surprise that the conclusions in the article seek to discredit carbon finance generally and the use of it to protect forests, both of which have been targets of Greenpeace for years.

Rather than seeking out the facts and reporting on them, The Guardian and Greenpeace set out to “convict” carbon offset credits. When one set of “facts” failed to pan out, they cooked up a new set … and when that approach also failed, they came up with a third line of attack. Specifically, the authors expressed upfront their predetermined conclusion and, over the course of eight months and three iterations, cherry-picked methods and facts in an attempt to support it.

  1. In August 2020 they declared that fewer than a dozen projects lacked quality. Their research methods, however, were roundly criticized by several experts and were subsequently withdrawn.
  2. In February 2021 they again declared that a somewhat different set of projects lacked quality, this time using a different methodological approach which was found to be flimsy and inappropriate.
  3. Last week they again declared that some projects lacked quality using a revised approach, which continues to be flawed (see details below).

Trying to force multiple approaches over a sustained period of time in an effort to “prove” their case and ignoring all of the projects they’ve been unable to find fault with clearly demonstrates a foregone conclusion and intentional rejection of the facts. This is not journalism: it is “hit piece” advocacy dressed up to look like journalism.

Despite knowing the obvious bias in the perspective of the authors, Verra and the projects’ supporters – including many who are in developing countries and work with indigenous communities – have been patient, forthcoming, and transparent with The Guardian. We shared information, provided multiple briefings, and patiently explained the fundamentals of assessing rainforest protection projects, only to find that the Greenpeace/Guardian agenda was impervious to input, change or even correction of glaring errors. Perhaps we were naive to assume that good journalism would win out in the end and that the success story of rainforest preservation projects and carbon offset credits would shine through. In the final analysis, we were used by journalists who clearly were just covering themselves by “checking the box” of consulting with us. As a result, the information and corrections we provided have been almost entirely ignored.

Read more.

Absent from Greenpeace and The Guardian’s consideration of this issue is any recognition of what rainforest preservation projects are doing on the ground and how they are contributing to the fight against climate change and deforestation. By The Guardian’s own reporting, an area the size of the Netherlands was deforested in 2020 alone, the result of powerful economic and political forces, including logging, mining and agriculture.

Verra runs the only program operating globally at multiple levels – from national to project level activities – that provides an incentive to preserve rainforests, not destroy them. It channels finance, technology, and know-how to forest-dependent rural communities who otherwise lack resources. These projects tackle deforestation in increasingly novel and creative ways. For instance, forest preservation projects hire local community members to patrol the forest and stop illegal logging and encroachment, as well as build fire lines to protect against wildfires. Projects often support farmers wanting to switch to more effective and sustainable land management practices, thereby reducing pressure on surrounding forests. Projects also provide life-saving benefits such as access to health care and clean water, as well as life-changing opportunities, such as education. In a nutshell, projects are working to transform local economies so that they no longer have to depend on cutting down the forest.

The Guardian and Greenpeace article also disregards updates that have been made to Verra’s methods for measuring the impact of rainforest preservation projects, precisely what they claim to be concerned about. Last month, we announced a comprehensive set of updates, including to the Jurisdictional and Nested REDD+ Framework (JNR), which followed a thorough two-year process comprising multiple phases of expert and academic input and peer review, as well as two rounds of public stakeholder consultations. The detailed updates are being published tomorrow (15 April), with a number of further updates scheduled over the coming year. To our knowledge, none of these changes are referenced in the article, even though they were discussed at length with the reporters and represent our commitment to making sure the accounting for emission reductions from forest preservation efforts is as accurate as possible, consistently incorporates the latest scientific best practice, and supports government-led efforts to stop deforestation. At a minimum, the Guardian should be informing its readers that this now-outdated article is a rearview-mirror exercise, that may provide some limited historical perspective, but is not a reflection of things on a going-forward basis.

Our detailed substantive critique of their article is set out in a separate Technical Annex. However, one of the key problems with their assessment is that it compares deforestation rates in projects concurrently against reference regions that were previously impacted by deforestation. For obvious reasons, these reference regions face different forward-looking deforestation pressures: significant areas of their forest were cut down in the past. These reference regions are important for establishing the threat of future deforestation in the project area – but are wholly inappropriate to assess project performance today. This methodological flaw in The Guardian/Greenpeace approach downplays the considerable success of Verra’s projects in preserving standing trees.

To be clear, Verra welcomes attention and scrutiny that is founded on honest and well-informed curiosity. This article, in light of its bias, ignorance, and one-sidedness, does not qualify. Furthermore, the article uses faulty logic in extrapolating, without evidentiary basis, that alleged problems with six projects means that millions of credits “may” be questionable. Such a claim is dangerous as it threatens to undermine one of the bright spots in the fight against climate change and the protection of natural tropical forests. There is simply no credible way that such a preposterous, unfounded and overreaching statement could be made and be considered good journalism.

Given these facts, Verra finds that Greenpeace and The Guardian are one-sided: they have not presented an accurate version of what, in fact, has been a real success story in fighting the scourge of deforestation. Perhaps this is the kind of one-sided advocacy piece that has a place in Unearthed, where a reader knows of Greenpeace’s agenda, but it has no place being passed off as journalism worthy of The Guardian. The sad irony here is that this baseless attack by The Guardian on the people who work hard every day to slow the ravaging toll of deforestation is just going to make the problem worse, not better.

14 April 2021

David Antonioli
Chief Executive Officer

Verra is a non-profit organization that develops and manages environmental and social standards. These standards include the Verified Carbon Standard (VCS), which is the world’s largest program for issuing carbon credits. 

TECHNICAL ANNEX

Background

The world’s tropical forests are being destroyed, driven by powerful economic and political forces such as mining, logging and industrial agriculture. Unchecked, tropical deforestation will make it impossible to stop runaway climate change and thus achieve the objectives set out under the Paris Agreement, given the vast volumes of carbon dioxide that are currently sequestered in standing forests.

The Verified Carbon Standard (VCS) Program is the only program operating at multiple levels – from national- to project-level activities – that gives countries and forest communities an incentive to preserve and restore their tropical forests, rather than destroy them. And it does so while safeguarding biodiversity as well as the ancestral ways of life of indigenous and rural communities.

How does the VCS work with regards to forest preservation and restoration projects? First, it requires a project to be implemented to preserve or restore a forest. Second, it assesses the impact of this project against a credible baseline (i.e., what would happen to the forest in the absence of the project). Third, it issues carbon credits equivalent to this impact: one credit equals one tonne of carbon dioxide equivalent that would otherwise have been released into the atmosphere. The project’s sponsors can sell these credits to governments, corporate buyers, and others who then neutralize their emissions or to measure their contributions to stopping climate change. The revenues generated by the sale of the carbon credits serves to sustain the implementation of project activities on the ground.

These tropical forest preservation and restoration projects are known under the acronym “REDD+”, which stands for Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (the plus sign indicates activities that also include conservation, sustainable management of forests and enhancement of forest carbon stocks).

Mr. Greenfield (The Guardian) and his Greenpeace partners allege that credits from certain REDD+ projects were incorrectly calculated and, by extension, that claims made by the credits’ purchasers are not credible. However, the authors’ allegations are problematic for the following reasons.

Technical Errors

The research behind the article is riddled with technical errors. Our communication with the reporters and a review of one of their data analyses indicate that they do not understand how to properly assess the impact of REDD+ projects.

A REDD+ project is successful if it reduces deforestation compared to the baseline. To set a baseline under the existing methods, the following steps are taken:

  1. A reference region (comparison area) is selected. This region shares the same geophysical characteristics as the project. Per our Methodological Requirements, which have been developed over many years with expert, academic and broad stakeholder input, this region is also “similar to the project area in terms of drivers and agents of deforestation and/or degradation, landscape configuration, and socio-economic and cultural conditions”.
  2. The rate of deforestation in that reference region over at least the previous 10 years is established.
  3. That rate of deforestation in the reference area serves as the baseline for the REDD+ project, given the similarities between it and the reference region. Importantly, the patterns experienced in the reference region in the historical 10-year period are expected to play out in the project area during the project implementation.

Every baseline is independently verified (by a third-party auditor) against the VCS Standard and an independently assessed methodology, which sets out the rules and requirements for how such baselines are to be set.

Mr. Greenfield and his Greenpeace partners have undertaken three distinct research methodologies to prove their point, but each one disregards important elements of the project development and assessment process, therefore producing erroneous results.

The first analysis (August 2020) assessed absolute primary forest cover loss using satellite imagery in the project area and did not take into account changes in the deforestation rate; it simply concluded that the projects had failed if any deforestation occurred after the project start date. This ignores the fact that slowing deforestation represents real progress for climate action, and the fact that stopping deforestation completely is incredibly difficult and will take time. As a result, this analysis was roundly criticized by the Global Forest Watch Initiative at the World Resources Institute, an independent open-source web application that monitors global forests in near real-time.

The second analysis (early 2021) took a different approach and sought to evaluate the deforestation rate in the project areas as compared to deforestation in a comparison area selected by the research team. While this is technically a better approach, the criteria used to select these alternative comparison areas do not accurately reflect the full set of criteria needed to properly establish a reference area (see above). The results from this analysis are therefore not credible. Additionally, these alternative baselines were established over the period 2001- 2019 for all projects, regardless of project start date, which means the timeframe significantly overlapped with the implementation of the projects. This approach contravenes the basic tenet of establishing a credible baseline which is generally defined as an “initial set of critical observations or data used for comparison or a control [emphasis added],” meaning, this data is typically established prior to the onset of a study. In accordance with this definition, the VCS rules require that baselines “shall be based on historical factors over at least the previous 10 years [emphasis added] that explain past patterns and can be used to make future projections of deforestation” (Section 3.4.14(2)).

The third analysis looked at baselines in the reference regions used by the projects. However, this analysis still uses incorrect timeframes for establishing baseline deforestation rates and considers deforestation in the reference region at the same time the project is being implemented. The approach then compares deforestation rates in projects concurrently against their reference regions which were previously impacted by deforestation. For obvious reasons, these reference regions face different forward-looking deforestation pressures: significant areas of their forest were lost in the past. As a result, comparing deforestation rates in the reference region and the project areas during the same time period is a wholly inappropriate approach for assessing project performance. Patterns in the historical period of the reference area would be expected to play out in the project area, were it not for the project activities. The whole point of a REDD+ project is to reduce or stop that threat from impacting the project area before it is lost.

The 100-Year Permanence Argument

The reporters make frequent reference to the concept that the carbon storage resulting from these forest projects should be guaranteed for 100 years to offset greenhouse gas emissions while the lifespan of the project typically is 20 or 30 years. The 100-year reference is related to the estimated atmospheric lifetime of CO2 and is separate from and unrelated to the crediting period of a project, which is typically 20-30 years.

This is, first, a misunderstanding of the VCS rules. VCS forest carbon projects may have a crediting period of 20-100 years. This reflects not the project “lifespan”, but the length of time for which they can claim carbon credits. These projects must have a “project longevity” of and implement activities for at least 30 years. In addition, the shorter the project, the higher the non-permanence risk buffer withholding will be, which helps to manage risk of any “reversal” (a loss of carbon) later.

This argument neglects the fact that acting now can help us stay below the planet’s tipping point because of the very real impact avoiding deforestation and forest degradation today has on climate mitigation. Every tree that is not felled will therefore not emit carbon into it. Such short-term carbon avoidance of emissions is critical because it results in lower CO2 accumulation in the atmosphere which will reduce global warming.

The insistence on projects needing to stay in place for 100 years also disregards the specific role and impact REDD+ projects have in the long term. As carbon projects across all sectors, forest carbon projects are a transition mechanism to longer-term, low-emissions development. Over time, they create and sustain economic models that value the forest standing more than cutting it down and that enable people to earn livelihoods from preserving them.

The 30-year crediting period (i.e., the length of time it will seek carbon credits) of a project does not mean that its interventions will stop or be reversed after that period. Instead, the goal is for a project’s activities to be transformed into lasting policy interventions that will lead to long-term systemic changes. For example, carbon finance helped support the early implementation of renewable energy projects around the world, which has now completely transformed the power sector in many countries; as a result, such activities in most countries are considered by many, including us, to no longer need carbon finance. The original projects, and scores of others now implemented have not stopped producing renewable energy as a result – rather, carbon markets helped drive the transformation of the industry.

Finally, the VCS also ensures the permanence and the environmental integrity of its carbon credits in the case of a “reversal” (i.e., after issuing credits for sequestering CO2, a project suffers a loss event, such as a fire, that releases the sequestered CO2 back into the atmosphere). The VCS requires all land-based projects to set aside a risk-adjusted percentage of the emission reductions and removals achieved, which are then placed into a global buffer pool. The buffer pool works much as insurance does, and “buffer credits” – managed by the VCS (not by the project owner) – can be canceled when reversals occur.

 

22 April 2021: Additional Response

Unfortunately, we remain gravely concerned that you do not understand how our requirements work and, as a result, are on the verge of publishing a deeply flawed article that could undermine both forest preservation efforts and The Guardian’s reputation for fair and accurate journalism.

Read more.

For the record, we stand by 100 percent of our first response (transmitted via email on 14 April 2021). Nothing in this second response is to be understood as modifying or retracting any part of our first response. Our intention here is to continue to warn that your approach is based on misconceptions and also suffers from further flaws, which means that any story flowing from that approach will be fatally flawed.

Flawed Analysis

Specifically, we are deeply concerned that you continue to misunderstand how data from reference regions is used to assess the effectiveness of REDD projects. This misunderstanding results in the profoundly flawed methodological approach that underlies your entire analysis.

You write: “Our analysis compares predictions projects made about reference regions (crucially excluding project areas) with figures from Hansen et al data for forest loss in those same reference regions (excluding project areas).”

As already outlined (please see the first item in the “Technical Errors” section in our first response), and reiterated here, the process REDD projects undertake to establish their baseline is as follows:

  1. A reference region (comparison area) is selected. This region shares the same geophysical characteristics as the project. Per our Methodological Requirements, which have been developed over many years with expert, academic and broad stakeholder input, this region is also “similar to the project area in terms of drivers and agents of deforestation and/or degradation, landscape configuration, and socio-economic and cultural conditions”.
  2. The rate of deforestation in that reference region over at least the previous 10 years is established.
  3. That rate of deforestation in the reference area serves as the baseline for the REDD+ project, given the similarities between it and the reference region. Importantly, the patterns experienced in the reference region in the historical 10-year period are expected to play out in the project area during the project implementation.

As previously explained in our first response, the problem with your approach is that it uses incorrect timeframes for establishing baseline deforestation rates, and considers deforestation in the reference region at the same time the project is being implemented.

The approach then compares deforestation rates in projects concurrently against their reference regions which were previously impacted by deforestation. For obvious reasons, these reference regions face different forward-looking deforestation pressures: significant areas of their forest were lost in the past. As a result, comparing deforestation rates in the reference region and the project areas during the same time period is a wholly inappropriate approach for assessing project performance. Patterns in the historical period of the reference area would be expected to play out in the project area, were it not for the project activities. The whole point of a REDD+ project is to reduce or stop that threat from impacting the project area before it is lost.

Predetermined Conclusion

Also, you say that you dispute our statement that you had a predetermined conclusion; rather than letting the facts guide you, the key conclusions were reached in advance, which is a clear reflection of the agenda-driven “journalism” we are objecting to here. This is not supposition on our part; we have this in writing from Mr. Greenfield. When he reached out to the REDD project developers last August, Mr. Greenfield wrote:

“We are proposing to write an article that reports:

  • Vast expanses of virgin forest are disappearing from tree conservation schemes used by major airlines to offset carbon emissions.
  • The basis on which carbon credits have been generated and sold is unreliable and air passengers cannot be sure emissions from their journey have been offset because of the primary forest loss.
  • While many of the projects analysed perform high quality conservation work in threatened regions, airlines cannot rely on such projects to make net-zero commitments about climate change.”

Further, in emails to the projects in early February, Mr. Greenfield stated:

  • “Based on analysis of ten REDD+ projects used by major airlines, several may have overstated emissions reductions due to unclear baselines used, accelerating rates of deforestation and concerns over the permanence of the schemes.
  • The basis on which carbon credits have been generated and sold to passengers is unreliable and air passengers cannot be sure emissions from their ‘carbon neutral’ journeys have been truly offset because of the inherent uncertainty in the REDD+ and Verra methodologies.
  • While many of the projects analysed perform high-quality conservation work in threatened regions, airlines cannot rely on such projects to make net-zero commitments about climate change because of the uncertainty shown in the MIS analysis.”

This is not fact-based journalism. It is something more akin to a political campaign, where someone sets out to defame a rival candidate along certain lines and then manufactures the “dirt” needed to do so. All we ever expected here was a fair journalistic approach, where you look into a topic, find the facts, and then either report on them or not. Nothing like that is happening here.

Questions

With regard to your questions about the consolidation of REDD+ methodologies:

  • “Regarding permanence. Is deforestation monitored by Verra after a project crediting period has come to an end; either currently or under the new methodology?”
    No. However, all remaining buffer credits at the end of the crediting period are cancelled to offset any future losses. In addition, as we’ve explained previously, the purpose of projects is to transform local economies so that communities and individuals have alternative sources of income and no longer have to depend on cutting down the forest. In the long run, as countries increasingly develop concrete plans to stop deforestation, project activities will be incorporated into lasting policy interventions that will lead to long-term conservation of forests.
  • “Does the new Jurisdictional and Nested REDD+ (JNR) Framework apply to any of the projects we have mentioned?”
    The JNR Framework is for jurisdictional accounting and provides the tools to integrate project activities (see our response to your question below for an explanation of how the tools work). The risk mapping tool and allocation tool can also be used by jurisdictions that are applying other jurisdictional accounting frameworks for the purpose of nesting. Where the jurisdiction does not yet have a jurisdictional REDD program in place, projects may remain as “standalone” activities, and the forthcoming consolidated methodology will apply to all such REDD projects. The consolidated methodology will require the same risk mapping and allocation tools and will apply to all existing projects as of their next required baseline update. In cases where jurisdictions establish FRELs prior to the time a project is scheduled to update its baseline, the jurisdiction may require a shorter timeframe to do so. So, in short, yes, our new rules will apply to all projects including all of those analyzed by MIS.
  • “In Verra’s release about its new measures, it states that it will “Require the use of a qualifying FREL…”. FRELS are described as a “starting point”. How will projects adapt these to create baseline deforestation scenarios? Is this yet known.”
    Yes, the FREL is the jurisdictional Forest Reference Emission Level, based on historical deforestation and degradation over the last 4-6 years. Once determined, the jurisdiction may apply the “risk mapping tool,” to identify the areas around the jurisdiction most at threat (largely based on distance from historical deforestation/degradation). The “allocation tool” then uses the FREL data (e.g., the rate of deforestation) and the risk map to allocate where future deforestation is likely to occur. The project baseline is thus determined by the results of these tools as projects are assigned their “part” of the jurisdictional FREL. Going forward, projects will no longer use a reference area to establish their baseline.

These questions are good ones to ask as they, and our responses, should start give you a better understanding of how our requirements work. However, it is rather disappointing you are coming to these questions only after eight months of allegedly independent investigations. Anyone wanting to understand how our program works would have asked these types of questions months ago and would have had a treasure trove of information to review readily at their disposal.

22 April 2021

David Antonioli
Chief Executive Officer

Verra is a non-profit organization that develops and manages environmental and social standards. These standards include the Verified Carbon Standard (VCS), which is the world’s largest program for issuing carbon credits.

27 April 2021: Additional Response

Read more.

Question 1

“We are aware of a number of approaches currently under discussion for how credits are issued. Under the approach you are pursuing our understanding currently is that credits could still be issued at a project level but that they would be issued against baselines drawn up at a jurisdictional level and then broken down using the allocation tool based – for the most part – on local historical deforestation (I note you are consulting on this).
Whilst projects could be/would be nested within jurisdictional programmes and reference levels audited credits would be issued directly by the projects against success in reducing deforestation within the project area. Projects-level crediting would not be dependent on what happens elsewhere in the jurisdiction going forwards except in as much as that would influence the next national reference level and so the project baseline when it is revised in 4-6 years.
In short, projects continue to issue credits independently but within a national framework. Is this understanding correct and – if not – please do clarify.”

Response:

Baselines: Your understanding of how baselines will be established going forward appears to be correct: the process will require the development of a jurisdictional baseline (Forest Reference Emission Level, FREL) and then allocating that down to projects based on a risk mapping tool and the allocation tool.

Project-level crediting: How project-level activities are credited is a policy decision that each government needs to make. The JNR Program Guide lays out three scenarios, which can be summarized as follows:

  • Scenarios 1 and 2: Governments can decide to allow projects to issue credits against their performance. Under Scenario 1, there is ONLY project level crediting based on the FREL; Scenario 2 is for jurisdictional programs and allows crediting to both the jurisdiction and projects.
  • Scenario 3: Is only for crediting to the government who can then oversee/supervise the revenues projects receive through a benefit-sharing mechanism that would be established and agreed to by the government and projects.

Scenarios 1 or 2 would give project developers the certainty to commit resources/investment for forest protection while also also allowing governments to benefit, for example, in the form of a tax or a share of the emission reductions achieved.

Question 2

“In general terms and given the rapid development in this area we are interested in any comment you have regarding the timing of these changes. What they are designed to achieve and why they are being rolled out at this point?”

Response:

Our role as a standard setter is to make sure our requirements reflect best practice, lessons learned and the latest scientific findings. We therefore constantly update our requirements through extensive public consultations and other ways of obtaining input from stakeholders. The most recent changes to JNR are the product of our most recent update process which began more than two years ago and which included a first consultation (December 2019 – January 2020) and a second consultation (October – December 2020), as well as input from our Stakeholder and Advisory groups, and piloting the new tools with countries and projects around the world.

Question 3

“Under the proposed changes will it be possible for projects to select reference regions separate to the project area itself or will project area reference regions essentially comprise the project area with deforestation analysed historically over a 4-6 year period. If the latter, how will base-lines be re-calculated as projects succeed in reducing deforestation within their project areas.”

Response:

The new requirements for establishing baselines for nested projects do not use reference areas, and instead require that baselines are allocated from jurisdictional Forest Reference Levels (FRELs) where one has been developed for the jurisdiction.

FRELs are based on historical average GHG emissions (guidance on the use of historical deforestation trends is forthcoming) from the past 4-6 years. Experts agree that this is the optimal method for predicting near-future carbon stock changes.

A new Allocation Tool and the new JNR Risk Mapping tool enable a jurisdiction to allocate its FREL throughout its territory, including to projects, based on deforestation and/or forest degradation risk in and around it. This will allow nested projects to set their baselines based on their respective government FRELs.

The forthcoming consolidated REDD+ methodology will apply to all standalone projects (i.e., those in countries without FRELs or REDD+ programs at the jurisdictional level) as of their next baseline update, and will use the same approach as outlined above. Specifically, projects will essentially use the entire jurisdiction as the reference area, use the same accounting rules as setting a FREL to establish a jurisdictional-level baseline, and then allocate that to individual projects using the risk mapping and allocation tools.

27 April 2021

David Antonioli
Chief Executive Officer

Verra is a non-profit organization that develops and manages environmental and social standards. These standards include the Verified Carbon Standard (VCS), which is the world’s largest program for issuing carbon credits.

28 April 2021: Additional Response

“Do the new methodologies and approaches have any impact on existing VCUs from REDD+ projects? As we discussed in the briefing a few weeks ago, credits are being certified in a different way and you said that did not mean they were better or worse, just different.”

Read more.

Response:

To begin, we want to be very clear that we are not amending any aspect of our previous responses, which we stand by 100 percent. Our core concerns about the work you are doing — and how you are doing it — remain unchanged.

In response to your question: No, the new approach to setting baselines does not apply to existing VCUs from REDD+ projects. Those projects followed the requirements and the accounting methodologies that were in place when they were registered and which were developed taking into account best practice, lessons learned, the latest scientific findings at the time, and extensive stakeholder input. Given those projects followed the program requirements and the respective accounting methodologies, including having the project design validated and the results verified by independent auditors, those VCUs represent real and permanent emission reductions.

As we mentioned already, our role as a standard setter is to make sure our requirements reflect best practice, lessons learned and the latest scientific findings, and in order to achieve that we constantly update our requirements. In addition, we need to make sure that any new rules apply to existing projects, which is why we require existing REDD+ projects to apply the new rules, which will happen when they need to update their baselines.

As we indicated in our media briefing, the new approach to setting baselines (based on Forest Reference Emission Levels, FRELs) is a different way of doing this, but does not mean that the previous approach was inherently bad. Indeed, there are many experts who argue that the level of precision required for jurisdictional baselines is much lower than what is currently required for establishing baselines using reference areas, and could therefore result in not properly recognizing the level of threat faced by particular patches of forest. In addition, it is important to note that the emergence of FRELs has enabled the integration of projects and jurisdictional efforts, in many ways through the accounting, which we believe is critical to ensuring that our program supports long-term forest conservation efforts. Again, as a standard setter, we need to weigh the scientific evidence and the input we have received to make sure our requirements lead to credits that have integrity and are moving us towards a future where forests are protected.

And yes, this change is analogous to some of the technological developments we have seen in audio. As a result of progress in this area, we now have technologies like mp3 files and satellite radio. However, records still exist and produce excellent sound quality, even though they may not be as simple to store and are not as readily shared as electronic formats. But just because most of us rely on electronic formats for listening to music, this does not discount the value of records. In the end of the day, both electronic formats and records produce music, and both previous and current approaches to setting REDD+ project baselines generate real and permanent emission reductions.

Please consider this additional response as one that builds upon our earlier comments and is 100 percent in keeping with them. In no way should our responsiveness to your follow-up question be interpreted as a sign that our earlier concerns or objections have been withdrawn or are being modified here.

28 April 2021

David Antonioli
Chief Executive Officer

Verra is a non-profit organization that develops and manages environmental and social standards. These standards include the Verified Carbon Standard (VCS), which is the world’s largest program for issuing carbon credits.

Printable copy of Verra’s Open Responses.

 


Respuesta de Verra al artículo de The Guardian sobre las compensaciones de carbono utilizadas por las principales aerolíneas

Verra cuestiona firmemente el artículo de The Guardian publicado el 4 de mayo de 2021 sobre varios proyectos para la preservación del bosque tropical, las empresas que los respaldan y Verified Carbon Standard. El artículo muestra un claro sesgo, está plagado de errores sustanciales que delatan la ignorancia sobre la forma en que funciona la generación de créditos de carbono y no reconoce el papel de tales proyectos en la canalización de finanzas para salvar los bosques tropicales del mundo.

Durante los últimos meses, hemos tenido un intercambio continuo de correos electrónicos con los reporteros de The Guardian y Greenpeace. A continuación, compartimos los mensajes que enviamos a los periodistas.


14 de abril de 2021: Respuesta abierta

ESTE “PERIODISMO” DE THE GUARDIAN Y GREENPEACE AMENAZA LA CONSERVACIÓN DE LOS BOSQUES

Un artículo próximo a ser publicado en The Guardian que critica seis proyectos de preservación de bosques tropicales (de un total de 77 que supervisamos) y las empresas que los han apoyado está plagado de errores.

Tal como se nos ha relatado, el artículo de The Guardian exhibe un sesgo claro, está plagado de errores sustanciales que delatan la ignorancia sobre cómo funcionan los créditos para la compensación de carbono y no explica con precisión el papel vital de tales proyectos en la canalización de las finanzas que tanto se necesitan para la preservación de los bosques tropicales.

Lamentablemente, este artículo injusto, unilateral e inexacto socava los esfuerzos por salvar los bosques tropicales del mundo.

El artículo es producto de una colaboración entre The Guardian y Unearthed, el proyecto periodístico de Greenpeace que no ha ocultado su oposición a los créditos para la compensación de carbono. Como tal, no debería ser sorpresivo que sus conclusiones busquen desacreditar el financiamiento del carbono en general y su uso para la protección de los bosques, pese a que esta ha sido un objetivo de Greenpeace durante años.

En lugar de investigar los hechos e informar sobre ellos, The Guardian y Greenpeace se propusieron “condenar” los créditos de compensación de carbono. Cuando un conjunto de “hechos” no dio resultado, prepararon uno nuevo; y cuando ese enfoque también falló, idearon una tercera línea de ataque. Específicamente, los autores expresaron por adelantado una conclusión prefabricada y, en el transcurso de ocho meses y tres intentos, seleccionaron cuidadosamente algunos métodos y hechos en un intento de respaldarla:

  1. En agosto de 2020 aseguraron que cerca de una docena de proyectos carecía de calidad. Sin embargo, sus métodos de investigación fueron duramente criticados por varios expertos y dichas declaraciones fueron posteriormente retiradas.
  2. En febrero de 2021, volvieron a declarar que un conjunto algo diferente de proyectos carecía de calidad, esta vez utilizando un enfoque metodológico diferente que se consideró poco sólido e inapropiado.
  3. La semana pasada volvieron a declarar que algunos proyectos carecían de calidad, utilizando un enfoque revisado que sigue siendo defectuoso (ver detalles a continuación).

Tratar de forzar múltiples enfoques durante un período prolongado de tiempo en un esfuerzo por “demostrar” su postulado e ignorar todos los proyectos en los que no han podido encontrar fallas conduce claramente a una conclusión inalterable y demuestra un rechazo intencional de los hechos. Esto no es periodismo: es una pieza promocional disfrazada de periodismo.

A pesar de estar al tanto del sesgo obvio en la visión de los autores, Verra y quienes apoyan los proyectos (incluidos muchos participantes que se encuentran en países en desarrollo y trabajan con comunidades indígenas), han sido pacientes, comunicativos y transparentes con The Guardian. Compartimos información, brindamos múltiples aclaraciones y explicamos con paciencia los fundamentos de la evaluación de proyectos para la protección del bosque tropical, solo para descubrir que la agenda de Greenpeace y The Guardian era invariable a los aportes, cambios o incluso a la corrección de errores evidentes.

Tal vez fuimos ingenuos al suponer que el buen periodismo ganaría al final y que las historias de éxito de los proyectos de preservación del bosque tropical y los créditos de compensación de carbono resultantes de ellos se destacarían. En el análisis final, fuimos utilizados por periodistas que claramente tenían la intención única de “cumplir” con el requisito de consultar con nosotros. Como resultado, la información y las correcciones que proporcionamos se han ignorado casi por completo.

Más información.

En la consideración de Greenpeace y The Guardian sobre este tema no existe ningún reconocimiento de todo aquello que los proyectos de preservación del bosque tropical están haciendo en los territorios donde se desarrollan, ni de la forma en la cual están contribuyendo a la lucha contra el cambio climático y la deforestación. Según el propio informe de The Guardian, un área del tamaño de los Países Bajos fue deforestada solo en 2020 como resultado de poderosas fuerzas económicas y políticas, por cuenta de la tala, la minería y la agricultura.

Verra ejecuta el único programa global que opera en múltiples niveles (desde actividades nacionales hasta actividades de proyectos) y brinda un incentivo para preservar los bosques tropicales en lugar de destruirlos. Asimismo, canaliza las finanzas, las tecnologías y los conocimientos técnicos hacia las comunidades rurales dependientes de los bosques que, de otro modo, carecerían de recursos. Estos proyectos abordan la deforestación de formas cada vez más novedosas y creativas. Por ejemplo, los proyectos de preservación forestal contratan a miembros de las comunidades locales para que patrullen el bosque y detengan la tala ilegal y la invasión de actores externos, así como para construir líneas de protección de los incendios forestales.

A menudo, los proyectos ayudan a los agricultores que desean hacer la transición hacia prácticas de manejo del suelo más efectivas y sostenibles, con lo cual se reduce la presión sobre los bosques circundantes. Los proyectos también brindan beneficios que mejoran la calidad de vida de las comunidades, como la atención médica, el acceso a agua potable y a la educación. En pocas palabras, los proyectos están trabajando para transformar las economías locales, de modo que se elimine su dependencia de la tala de los bosques.

El artículo de The Guardian y Greenpeace también ignora las modificaciones realizadas a los métodos de Verra para medir el impacto de los proyectos de preservación del bosque tropical, precisamente el aspecto por el que señalan estar preocupados. El mes pasado anunciamos un conjunto integral de actualizaciones, incluyendo el Marco para REDD+ Jurisdiccional y Anidado (JNR), para el cual se llevó a cabo un proceso exhaustivo de dos años compuesto por múltiples fases en las que se recibieron aportes de expertos y académicos y se hizo la revisión de pares, así como dos rondas de consultas públicas con grupos de interés. Las actualizaciones detalladas se publicarán mañana (15 de abril) y existe una serie de cambios adicionales programados para el próximo año.

Hasta donde sabemos, no se hace referencia a ninguno de estos cambios en el artículo, a pesar de que ellos se discutieron extensamente con los reporteros y representan nuestro compromiso con la precisión de la contabilidad de las reducciones de emisiones de las iniciativas de preservación forestal, incorporan consistentemente los más recientes avances en prácticas científicas y respaldan los esfuerzos dirigidos por los gobiernos para detener la deforestación. Como mínimo, The Guardian debería informar a sus lectores que este artículo, ahora obsoleto, es un ejercicio retrospectivo, que puede proporcionar una mirada histórica limitada, pero no es un reflejo de los proyectos en el futuro.

Nuestra crítica detallada de su artículo se encuentra en un anexo técnico separado. Sin embargo, uno de los problemas clave con su evaluación es que compara las tasas de deforestación en diferentes proyectos con las de las regiones de referencia que fueron previamente impactadas por la deforestación. Por razones obvias, estas regiones de referencia enfrentan diferentes presiones de deforestación con miras al futuro, en tanto áreas significativas de sus bosques fueron taladas en el pasado. Estas regiones de referencia son importantes para establecer la amenaza de deforestación futura en el área del proyecto, pero son totalmente inapropiadas para evaluar el desempeño de los proyectos en la actualidad. Esta falla metodológica en el enfoque de The Guardian y Greenpeace minimiza el considerable éxito de los proyectos de Verra en la preservación de los árboles que se encuentran en pie.

Para ser claros, Verra acepta la atención y el escrutinio cuando este se basa en una curiosidad honesta y bien informada. Este artículo, a la luz de su parcialidad e ignorancia, no es uno de estos casos. Además, utiliza una lógica errónea al extrapolar, sin una base probatoria, que los supuestos problemas que existen con seis proyectos “podrían” poner en entredicho millones de créditos de carbono. Tal afirmación es peligrosa debido a que amenaza con socavar uno de los pilares de la lucha contra el cambio climático y la protección de los bosques tropicales naturales. Simplemente, no es posible que una declaración tan absurda, infundada y exagerada pueda ser considerada muestra de un buen periodismo.

Tomando en cuenta estos hechos, Verra encuentra que Greenpeace y The Guardian tienen una postura parcializada: no han presentado una versión precisa de lo que, de hecho, ha sido una verdadera historia de éxito en la lucha contra el flagelo de la deforestación. Quizás este es el tipo de artículo de defensa unilateral que tiene lugar en Unearthed, en el que Greenpeace exhibe su agenda al lector pero no consigue hacerse pasar por un buen periodismo, digno de The Guardian. La triste ironía aquí es que este ataque infundado de The Guardian contra las personas que trabajan exhaustivamente todos los días para frenar el devastador costo de la deforestación solo empeorará el problema, no lo mejorará.

14 de abril de 2021

David Antonioli
Director Ejecutivo

Verra es una organización sin fines de lucro que desarrolla y administra estándares ambientales y sociales. Estos estándares incluyen Verified Carbon Standard (VCS), el programa más grande del mundo para la emisión de créditos de carbono.

ANEXO TÉCNICO
Antecedentes

Los bosques tropicales del mundo están siendo destruidos como resultado de la presión ejercida por poderosas fuerzas económicas mediante actividades como la minería, la tala y la agricultura industrial. La deforestación descontrolada hará que sea imposible detener el acelerado cambio climático y así lograr los objetivos establecidos en el Acuerdo de París, dados los grandes volúmenes de dióxido de carbono que se encuentran almacenados actualmente en los bosques en pie.

Verified Carbon Standard (VCS) es el único programa que opera en múltiples niveles (desde actividades nacionales hasta actividades de proyecto) que brinda a los países y a las comunidades forestales un incentivo a cambio de preservar y restaurar sus bosques tropicales, en lugar de destruirlos. Y lo hace salvaguardando la biodiversidad y las formas de vida ancestrales de las comunidades indígenas y rurales.

¿Cómo funciona VCS con respecto a los proyectos de conservación y restauración forestal? Primero, es necesario que un proyecto de preservación o restauración de bosques se encuentre en implementación. En segundo lugar, el programa evalúa el impacto del proyecto en referencia con una línea base fiable (es decir, en el escenario de aquello que le sucedería al bosque en ausencia del proyecto). En tercer lugar, emite créditos de carbono equivalentes al impacto: un crédito corresponde a una tonelada de dióxido de carbono equivalente que, de otro modo, se habría liberado a la atmósfera. Los patrocinadores del proyecto pueden vender estos créditos a gobiernos, compradores del sector corporativo o a quienes deseen neutralizar sus emisiones o medir sus contribuciones para detener el cambio climático. Los ingresos generados por la venta de los créditos de carbono sirven para continuar con la implementación de las actividades del proyecto en el terreno.

Estos proyectos de conservación y restauración de bosques tropicales se conocen con el acrónimo “REDD+”, que significa Reducción de Emisiones causadas por la Deforestación y la Degradación de los Bosques (el signo más indica actividades que también incluyen la conservación, el manejo sostenible de los bosques y la mejora de las reservas de carbono forestal).

El Sr. Greenfield (de The Guardian) y sus compañeros de Greenpeace alegan que los créditos de ciertos proyectos de REDD+ se calcularon incorrectamente y, por extensión, que la asignación de estos a los compradores no son confiables. Sin embargo, las acusaciones de los autores son cuestionables por las razones que se exponen a continuación.

Errores técnicos

La investigación detrás del artículo está plagada de errores técnicos. Nuestra comunicación con los reporteros junto con la revisión de uno de sus análisis de datos indican que ellos no entienden cómo se debe evaluar adecuadamente el impacto de los proyectos de REDD+.

Un proyecto de REDD+ es exitoso si reduce la deforestación en comparación con la línea base, la cual se establece según los métodos existentes, siguiendo los siguientes pasos:

  1. Se selecciona una región de referencia (área de comparación) que comparte las mismas características geofísicas con el proyecto. De acuerdo con nuestros Requerimientos metodológicos –los cuales se han desarrollado durante varios años con el aporte de expertos, académicos y numerosos grupos de interés–, esta región también debe ser “similar al área del proyecto en términos de motores y agentes de la deforestación y/o degradación, configuración del paisaje y condiciones socioeconómicas y culturales”.
  2. Se establece la tasa de deforestación en la región de referencia durante, al menos, los 10 años previos al desarrollo del proyecto.
  3. Dicha tasa de deforestación en el área de referencia sirve como línea base para el proyecto de REDD+, tomando en cuenta las similitudes entre ambas. Es importante destacar que se espera que los patrones experimentados en la región de referencia en el período histórico de 10 años también se desarrollen en el área del proyecto durante la implementación del mismo.

Cada línea base es verificada de forma independiente (por un auditor externo) según el Estándar VCS y una metodología determinada –también evaluada de forma independiente– que establece las reglas y los requisitos sobre la forma en que aquellas se deben determinar.

El Sr. Greenfield y sus compañeros de Greenpeace han emprendido tres metodologías de investigación distintas para demostrar su argumento, pero cada una de ellas ignora elementos importantes del proceso de desarrollo y evaluación del proyecto, por lo que producen resultados erróneos.

El primer análisis (elaborado en agosto de 2020) evaluó la pérdida absoluta de cobertura forestal primaria utilizando imágenes de satélite en el área del proyecto y no tuvo en cuenta los cambios en la tasa de deforestación. Simplemente concluyó que los proyectos habían fracasado si se producía alguna deforestación después de la fecha de inicio del proyecto. Esto ignora el hecho de que reducir la velocidad de la deforestación representa un progreso real para la acción por el clima y de que detener la deforestación por completo es increíblemente difícil y llevará tiempo. Como resultado, este análisis fue criticado rotundamente por la iniciativa Global Forest Watch del Instituto de Recursos Mundiales, una aplicación web independiente de código abierto que monitorea los bosques del mundo casi en tiempo real.

El segundo análisis (a principios de 2021) adoptó un enfoque diferente y buscó evaluar la tasa de deforestación en las áreas de los proyectos en comparación con la deforestación en un área seleccionada por el equipo de investigación. Si bien este es un enfoque más apropiado técnicamente, los criterios utilizados para seleccionar las áreas de comparación alternativas no reflejan con precisión los criterios necesarios para establecer adecuadamente un área de referencia (ver arriba). Por lo tanto, los resultados de este análisis no son fiables. Además, estas líneas base alternativas se establecieron durante el período 2001-2019 para todos los proyectos, independientemente de la fecha de inicio de cada uno de ellos, lo que significa que dicho ciclo se superpuso significativamente a su implementación. Este enfoque contraviene el principio básico de establecer una línea base creíble que consista en un “conjunto inicial de observaciones críticas o en datos utilizados para la comparación o el control [énfasis agregado]”, es decir, estos datos se establecen típicamente antes del inicio de un estudio. De acuerdo con esta definición, las reglas de VCS establecen que las líneas base “deben fundamentarse en factores históricos durante al menos los 10 años anteriores [énfasis agregado] al inicio del proyecto, de modo que expliquen patrones pasados y puedan usarse para hacer proyecciones futuras de la deforestación” (Sección 3.4.14.(2)).

El tercer análisis examinó las líneas base en las regiones de referencia utilizadas por los proyectos. Sin embargo, este análisis aún se basó en períodos incorrectos para establecer las tasas de deforestación de referencia (también consideró la deforestación en la región de referencia al momento de la implementación del proyecto). Luego, el enfoque compara simultáneamente las tasas de deforestación de los proyectos con sus regiones de referencia, las cuales fueron previamente impactadas por la deforestación. Por razones obvias, estas regiones de referencia enfrentan diferentes presiones de deforestación con miras al futuro, en tanto se perdieron áreas significativas de sus bosques en el pasado. Como resultado, comparar las tasas de deforestación en la región de referencia con las de las áreas de los proyectos durante el mismo período es un enfoque totalmente inapropiado para evaluar el desempeño del proyecto. Como tal, se esperaría que los patrones en el período histórico del área de referencia se desarrollaran en el área del proyecto si no fuera por las actividades del mismo. El objetivo de un proyecto de REDD+ es reducir o evitar que esa amenaza afecte el área del proyecto antes de que se produzca su pérdida.

El argumento de la permanencia de 100 años

Los reporteros hacen referencia constantemente al concepto de que el almacenamiento de carbono resultante de estos proyectos forestales debe garantizarse durante 100 años para compensar las emisiones de gases de efecto invernadero, si bien la vida útil de los mismos suele ser de 20 o 30 años. La referencia de 100 años está relacionada con la vida útil atmosférica estimada del CO2 y es independiente del período de generación de créditos de un proyecto, que normalmente es de 20 a 30 años.

Para comenzar, esta asunción da cuenta de una falta de comprensión de las reglas de VCS. Los proyectos de carbono forestal de VCS pueden tener un período de generación de créditos de 20 a 100 años, lo cual no refleja la “vida útil” del proyecto, sino el tiempo durante el cual se pueden reclamar créditos de carbono. Estos proyectos deben tener una “longevidad” de al menos 30 años, tiempo durante el cual deben implementar las actividades correspondientes. Además, cuanto más corto sea el proyecto, mayor será la cantidad de créditos retenidos en la cuenta buffer por riesgo de no permanencia, lo que ayuda a hacer frente a la posibilidad de cualquier “reversión” (pérdida de carbono) posterior.

Este argumento pasa por alto el hecho de que actuar ahora puede ayudarnos a permanecer por debajo del punto de inflexión del planeta, gracias al impacto demostrado que tiene la prevención de la deforestación y la degradación forestal en la mitigación climática. Por lo tanto, todo árbol que deja de ser talado, no emitirá el carbono que tiene almacenado, y esas emisiones de carbono que se evitan son cruciales para el corto plazo porque dan como resultado una menor acumulación de CO2 en la atmósfera, lo que reducirá el calentamiento global.

La insistencia en que los proyectos deben permanecer en su lugar durante 100 años también ignora el papel específico y el impacto de las iniciativas de REDD+ a largo plazo. Al igual que los proyectos de carbono en los demás sectores, los de carbono forestal son un mecanismo de transición hacia un desarrollo bajo en emisiones a largo plazo. Con el tiempo, estos crean y mantienen modelos económicos que valoran más el bosque en pie que la tala y que permiten a las personas ganarse la vida preservándolos.

El hecho de que el período de generación de créditos de un proyecto sea de 30 años (es decir, el tiempo en el que este buscará certificar créditos de carbono) no significa que sus intervenciones se detendrán o revertirán tras su finalización. Por el contrario, el objetivo es que las actividades de un proyecto se transformen en intervenciones políticas duraderas que conduzcan a cambios sistémicos en el futuro. Por ejemplo, el financiamiento del carbono ayudó a respaldar la implementación temprana de proyectos de energía renovable en todo el mundo, lo que ha transformado completamente el sector energético en numerosos países. Como resultado, muchas personas, incluidos nosotros, consideran que estas actividades ya no necesitan la financiación del carbono en la mayoría de los países. De hecho, los proyectos originales y muchos otros que están siendo implementados en la actualidad no han dejado de producir energía renovable; más bien, los mercados de carbono ayudaron a impulsar la transformación de la industria.

Finalmente, el VCS también asegura la permanencia e integridad ambiental de sus créditos de carbono en caso de que ocurra una “reversión” (es decir, cuando después de emitir créditos, un proyecto sufre un evento de pérdida, como un incendio, liberando a la atmósfera el CO2 previamente capturado). El VCS demanda a todos los proyectos basados en el uso del suelo reservar un porcentaje de las reducciones y absorciones de emisiones logradas dependiendo de su riesgo, y ubicarlo en un fondo compartido global. Este fondo funciona de manera similar a los seguros y los “créditos de reserva” –administrados por el VCS y no por el propietario del proyecto– pueden cancelarse cuando se producen reversiones.

22 de abril de 2021: Respuesta adicional

Lamentablemente, nos sigue preocupando que ustedes no comprendan cómo funcionan nuestros requisitos y, como resultado, estén a punto de publicar un artículo profundamente defectuoso que podría socavar tanto los esfuerzos de preservación forestal como la reputación de The Guardian de ejercer un periodismo justo y preciso.

Más información.

Para constancia, nos sostenemos al 100 por ciento en nuestra primera respuesta (enviada por correo electrónico el 14 de abril de 2021). Ningún elemento en esta segunda respuesta debe entenderse como una modificación o retractación de nuestra primera respuesta. Por el contrario, nuestra intención aquí es continuar advirtiendo que su enfoque se basa en conceptos erróneos y, además, adolece de nuevas fallas. Ello significa que cualquier historia que surja de dicho enfoque tendrá fallas inevitables.

Análisis defectuoso

Específicamente, nos preocupa profundamente que continúen malinterpretando cómo se utilizan los datos de las regiones de referencia para evaluar la efectividad de los proyectos de REDD. Esta falta de claridad da como resultado el enfoque metodológico profundamente defectuoso que subyace en todo su análisis.

Ustedes escriben: “Nuestro análisis compara las predicciones hechas por los proyectos respecto a las regiones de referencia (excluyendo fundamentalmente las áreas de los proyectos) con cifras de Hansen et al. y datos sobre la pérdida de bosques en esas mismas regiones de referencia (excluyendo las áreas de los proyectos)”.

Como ya se ha descrito (ver el primer ítem en la sección “Errores técnicos” en nuestra primera respuesta) y reiterado aquí, el proceso que siguen los proyectos de REDD para establecer su línea base es el siguiente:

  1. Se selecciona una región de referencia (área de comparación) que comparte las mismas características geofísicas con el proyecto. De acuerdo con nuestros Requerimientos metodológicos –los cuales se han desarrollado durante varios años con el aporte de expertos, académicos y numerosos grupos de interés–, esta región también debe ser “similar al área del proyecto en términos de motores y agentes de la deforestación y/o degradación, configuración del paisaje y condiciones socioeconómicas y culturales”.
  2. Se establece la tasa de deforestación en esa región de referencia durante, al menos, los 10 años previos al desarrollo del proyecto.
  3. Dicha tasa de deforestación en el área de referencia sirve como línea base para el proyecto de REDD+, tomando en cuenta las similitudes entre ambas. Es importante destacar que se espera que los patrones experimentados en la región de referencia en el período histórico de 10 años también se desarrollen en el área del proyecto durante la implementación del mismo.

Como explicamos anteriormente en nuestra primera respuesta, el problema con su enfoque es que utiliza períodos incorrectos para establecer las tasas de deforestación de la línea base y considera la deforestación en la región de referencia al mismo tiempo en que se implementa el proyecto.

Luego, el enfoque compara simultáneamente las tasas de deforestación de los proyectos con sus regiones de referencia, las cuales fueron previamente impactadas por la deforestación. Por razones obvias, estas regiones de referencia enfrentan diferentes presiones de deforestación con miras al futuro, en tanto se perdieron áreas significativas de sus bosques en el pasado. Como resultado, comparar las tasas de deforestación en la región de referencia con las de las áreas de los proyectos durante el mismo período es un enfoque totalmente inapropiado para evaluar el desempeño de estos. Como tal, se esperaría que los patrones en el período histórico del área de referencia se desarrollaran en el área del proyecto si no fuera por las actividades del mismo. El objetivo de un proyecto de REDD+ es reducir o evitar que esa amenaza afecte el área del proyecto antes de que se produzca su pérdida.

Conclusión predeterminada

Además, ustedes afirman estar en desacuerdo con nuestra declaración de que existía una conclusión predeterminada. No obstante, en lugar de dejar que los hechos los guiaran, llegaron a deducciones clave con anticipación, lo cual es un claro reflejo de un “periodismo” impulsado por una agenda, al cual nos oponemos aquí. Esta no es una suposición de nuestra parte, ya que tenemos por escrito la siguiente comunicación del Sr. Greenfield cuando él se acercó a los desarrolladores de proyectos de REDD en agosto pasado:

“Estamos proponiendo escribir un artículo que informe lo siguiente:

  • Vastas extensiones de bosques vírgenes están desapareciendo de los esquemas de conservación de árboles utilizados por las principales aerolíneas para compensar sus emisiones de carbono.
  • La base sobre la cual se han generado y vendido los créditos de carbono no es confiable y los pasajeros aéreos no pueden estar seguros de que las emisiones de su viaje se hayan compensado debido a la pérdida de bosques primarios.
  • Si bien muchos de los proyectos analizados realizan un trabajo de conservación de alta calidad en regiones amenazadas, las aerolíneas no pueden confiar en ellos para hacer compromisos climáticos de cero neto.”

Además, en correos electrónicos enviados a los proyectos a principios de febrero, el Sr. Greenfield declaró:

  • “Según el análisis realizado a diez proyectos de REDD+ utilizados por las principales aerolíneas, varios pueden haber exagerado las reducciones de emisiones debido al uso de líneas base poco claras, tasas de deforestación aceleradas y preocupaciones sobre la permanencia de los esquemas.
  • La base sobre la cual se han generado y vendido los créditos de carbono a los pasajeros aéreos no es confiable, por lo cual estos no pueden estar seguros de que las emisiones de sus viajes ‘neutrales en carbono’ hayan sido realmente compensados debido a la incertidumbre inherente en las metodologías de REDD+ y Verra.
  • Si bien muchos de los proyectos analizados realizan trabajos de conservación de alta calidad en regiones amenazadas, las aerolíneas no pueden confiar en ellos para hacer compromisos climáticos de cero neto debido a la incertidumbre mostrada en el análisis realizado por McKenzie Intelligence Services (MIS)”.

Este no es un periodismo basado en hechos. Es algo más parecido a una campaña política, donde alguien se propone difamar a un candidato rival en ciertos aspectos y luego fabrica la “trampa” necesaria para hacerlo. Todo lo que esperábamos aquí era un enfoque periodístico justo, en el que se analizara un tema, se encontraran los hechos y luego se informara sobre ellos o no. Pero nada de ello está sucediendo aquí.

Preguntas

Con respecto a sus preguntas sobre la consolidación de metodologías para REDD+:

  • “Respecto a la permanencia, ¿Verra monitorea la deforestación después de que finaliza el período de generación de créditos del proyecto, ya sea actualmente o de acuerdo con una nueva metodología?”
    No. Sin embargo, todos los créditos de reserva que se encuentran disponibles al final del período de generación de créditos se cancelan para compensar cualquier pérdida futura. Además, como explicamos anteriormente, el propósito de los proyectos es transformar las economías locales para que las comunidades y los individuos tengan fuentes alternativas de ingresos y no deban depender de la tala del bosque. A largo plazo, a medida que los países desarrollen planes concretos para detener la deforestación, las actividades del proyecto se incorporarán a intervenciones políticas duraderas que conducirán a la conservación de los bosques.
  • “¿El nuevo Marco Jurisdiccional y Anidado para REDD+ (JNR) se aplica a alguno de los proyectos que hemos mencionado?”
    El marco JNR es para la contabilidad jurisdiccional y proporciona las herramientas para integrar actividades de proyecto (encuentre a continuación nuestra respuesta a su pregunta para obtener una explicación de cómo funcionan las herramientas). La herramienta de mapeo de riesgos y la herramienta de asignación también pueden ser utilizadas por jurisdicciones que están aplicando otros marcos de contabilidad jurisdiccional con el propósito de hacer una anidación. Cuando la jurisdicción aún no cuenta con un programa de REDD jurisdiccional, los proyectos pueden permanecer como actividades “independientes” y se les aplica la próxima metodología consolidada. Esta requerirá las mismas herramientas de asignación y mapeo de riesgos y se aplicará a todos los proyectos existentes a partir de la próxima actualización de su línea base. En los casos en que las jurisdicciones establecen sus NREF antes de la fecha programada para la actualización de la línea de base de un proyecto, la jurisdicción puede requerir un plazo más corto para hacerlo. Entonces, en resumen, sí, nuestras nuevas reglas se aplicarán a todos los proyectos, incluidos todos los analizados por MIS.
  • “En el comunicado de Verra sobre sus nuevas medidas, se afirma que se ‘requerirá el uso de un NREF calificado…’ y los NREF se describen como un ‘punto de partida’. ¿Cómo adaptarán los proyectos los NREF para crear escenarios de deforestación de línea base? ¿Se sabe esto desde ya?”
    Sí, el NREF es el Nivel de Emisión de Referencia de Emisiones Forestales para el ámbito jurisdiccional, el cual es definido con base en la deforestación y degradación histórica durante los últimos 4-6 años. Una vez este sea determinado, la jurisdicción puede aplicar la herramienta de mapeo de riesgos para identificar las áreas más amenazadas alrededor de la jurisdicción (en gran parte, basándose en la distancia desde la deforestación/degradación histórica). A continuación, la herramienta de asignación utiliza los datos del NREF (por ejemplo, la tasa de deforestación) y el mapa de riesgo para asignar el lugar donde es probable que ocurra la deforestación en el futuro. Por lo tanto, la línea base de un proyecto está determinada por los resultados de estas herramientas, ya que a los proyectos se les asigna su “parte” del NREF jurisdiccional. En el futuro, los proyectos ya no utilizarán un área de referencia para establecer su línea base.

Estas preguntas son convenientes de hacer, ya que, junto con nuestras respuestas, deberían permitir una mejor comprensión sobre cómo funcionan nuestros requisitos. Sin embargo, es bastante decepcionante que ustedes lleguen a estas preguntas solo después de ocho meses de investigaciones supuestamente independientes. Cualquier persona que quisiera entender cómo funciona nuestro programa habría hecho este tipo de preguntas hace meses y habría contado con información valiosa para su evaluación.

22 de abril de 2021

David Antonioli
Director Ejecutivo

Verra es una organización sin fines de lucro que desarrolla y administra estándares ambientales y sociales. Estos estándares incluyen Verified Carbon Standard (VCS), el programa más grande del mundo para la emisión de créditos de carbono.

27 de abril de 2021: Respuesta adicional

Read more.

Pregunta 1

“Estamos al tanto de que se están debatiendo actualmente una serie de enfoques sobre la forma en la cual se emiten los créditos. Según el enfoque que ustedes siguen, nuestro entendimiento actual es que los créditos aún podrían emitirse a nivel de proyecto, pero lo harían a partir de líneas base jurisdiccionales y luego se desglosarían utilizando la herramienta de asignación, la cual está basada –en su mayor parte– en la deforestación histórica local (observo que ustedes están haciendo consultas sobre esto).
Mientras tanto, los proyectos podrían estar o estarían anidados dentro de programas jurisdiccionales y los créditos auditados según los niveles de referencia serían emitidos directamente con base en el éxito en la reducción de la deforestación dentro del área de proyecto. La generación de créditos para los proyectos no dependería en el futuro de lo que suceda en otras áreas de la jurisdicción, excepto en la medida en que ello influya en el siguiente nivel de referencia nacional y, por lo tanto, en la línea base del proyecto cuando se revise dentro de 4 o 6 años.

En resumen, los proyectos continúan emitiendo créditos de forma independiente pero dentro de un marco nacional. ¿Es correcto este razonamiento? Si no es así, por favor aclárenlo.”

Respuesta:

Líneas base: Su comprensión de cómo se establecerán las líneas base en el futuro parece ser correcta: el proceso requerirá el desarrollo de una línea base jurisdiccional (Nivel de Referencia de Emisiones Forestales, NREF) que luego se asignará a los proyectos con base en una herramienta de mapeo de riesgos y en la herramienta de asignación.

Generación de créditos a partir de proyectos: La forma en que las actividades de proyecto generan créditos es una decisión de política que debe ser tomada por cada gobierno. La Guía del Programa JNR presenta tres escenarios, que se pueden resumir de la siguiente manera:

  • Escenarios 1 y 2: Los gobiernos pueden permitir que los proyectos emitan créditos con base en su desempeño. En el escenario 1, los proyectos generan créditos ÚNICAMENTE con base en el NREF, mientras que el escenario 2 abarca programas jurisdiccionales y permite generar créditos tanto a las jurisdicciones como a los proyectos.
  • Escenario 3: Es aplicable únicamente para el gobierno, quien luego puede supervisar los ingresos que reciben los proyectos mediante un mecanismo de distribución de beneficios que sería establecido y acordado por el gobierno mismo y los proyectos.

Los escenarios 1 y 2 darían a los desarrolladores de proyectos la certeza de comprometer recursos o inversiones para la protección forestal y, al mismo tiempo, permitirían que los gobiernos se beneficien, por ejemplo, al recibir un impuesto o una participación de las reducciones de emisiones logradas.

Pregunta 2

“En términos generales y considerando el rápido desarrollo en esta área, estamos interesados en cualquier comentario que tenga sobre el momento en que se efectuarán estos cambios. ¿Qué se proponen lograr con su diseño y por qué se están introduciendo en este momento?”

Respuesta:

El papel de Verra como creador de estándares es asegurarse de que sus requisitos reflejen las mejores prácticas, las lecciones aprendidas y los últimos avances científicos. Por lo tanto, los actualizamos constantemente luego de conducir amplias consultas públicas y utilizar otras formas para obtener aportes de nuestros grupos de interés. Los cambios más recientes a JNR son el producto de nuestro último proceso de actualización, el cual comenzó hace más de dos años e incluyó una primera consulta (de diciembre de 2019 a enero de 2020) y una segunda (de octubre a diciembre de 2020), así como la recepción de diferentes aportes de nuestros grupos de interés y asesores, y el pilotaje de las nuevas herramientas con países y proyectos de todo el mundo.

Pregunta 3

“De acuerdo con los cambios propuestos, ¿será posible seleccionar regiones de referencia separadas de las áreas de los proyectos o las regiones de referencia comprenderán esencialmente las áreas de los proyectos cuya deforestación ha sido analizada históricamente durante un período de entre 4 y 6 años? Si la respuesta es la última, ¿cómo se volverán a calcular las líneas base a medida que los proyectos logren reducir la deforestación dentro de sus áreas?”.

Respuesta:

Los nuevos requerimientos no utilizan áreas de referencia para establecer las líneas base de proyectos anidados, sino que exigen que estas se asignen a partir de Niveles de Referencia de Emisiones Forestales (NREF), en los casos en que se haya desarrollado uno para la jurisdicción correspondiente.

Los NREF se basan en las emisiones de GEI históricas promedio (próximamente se brindará orientación sobre el uso de las tendencias históricas de deforestación) de los últimos 4 a 6 años. Los expertos coinciden en que este es el método óptimo para predecir los cambios en los stocks de carbono en el futuro cercano.

Una nueva Herramienta de asignación y la nueva Herramienta de mapeo de riesgos de JNR le permiten a las jurisdicciones asignar el NREF para todo su territorio, e incluso para los proyectos, con base en el riesgo de deforestación y/o degradación forestal dentro y alrededor de él. Esto posibilitará a los proyectos anidados establecer sus líneas base en función de sus respectivos NREF gubernamentales.

La próxima metodología consolidada para REDD+ se aplicará a todos los proyectos independientes (es decir, a aquellos ubicados en países sin NREF o programas jurisdiccionales de REDD+) a partir de la próxima actualización de sus líneas base y utilizará el mismo enfoque descrito anteriormente. Esencialmente, los proyectos usarán toda la jurisdicción como área de referencia, emplearán las mismas reglas contables del NREF para establecer una línea base jurisdiccional y luego asignarán los valores resultantes a proyectos individuales utilizando las herramientas de asignación y de mapeo de riesgos.

27 de abril de 2021

David Antonioli
Director Ejecutivo

Verra es una organización sin fines de lucro que desarrolla y administra estándares ambientales y sociales. Estos estándares incluyen Verified Carbon Standard (VCS), el programa más grande del mundo para la emisión de créditos de carbono.

28 de abril de 2021: Respuesta adicional

“¿Las nuevas metodologías y los nuevos enfoques tienen algún impacto en las VCU existentes que provienen de proyectos de REDD+? Como discutimos en la sesión informativa hace unas semanas, los créditos se están certificando de una manera diferente y ustedes dijeron que eso no significaba que fueran mejores o peores, solo diferentes”.

Read more.

Respuesta:

Para empezar, queremos dejar muy claro que no estamos modificando ningún aspecto de nuestras respuestas anteriores, en las cuales nos sostenemos al 100 por ciento. Sin embargo, nuestras preocupaciones principales sobre el trabajo que ustedes están haciendo, y cómo lo están haciendo, siguen invariables.

En respuesta a su pregunta: No, el nuevo enfoque para establecer líneas base no se aplica a las VCU existentes que provienen de proyectos de REDD+. Estos proyectos siguieron los requisitos y las metodologías contables que estaban vigentes al ser registrados y que se desarrollaron teniendo en cuenta las mejores prácticas, las lecciones aprendidas, los últimos hallazgos científicos en ese momento y la amplia contribución de varios grupos de interés. Dado que esos proyectos siguieron los requisitos del programa y las respectivas metodologías contables, incluyendo la validación de su diseño y la verificación de sus resultados por parte de auditores independientes, dichas VCU representan reducciones de emisiones reales y permanentes.

Como ya lo mencionamos, nuestro papel como creador de estándares es asegurarnos de que nuestros requisitos reflejen las mejores prácticas, las lecciones aprendidas y los últimos avances científicos, y para lograrlo, nos dedicamos a actualizarlos constantemente. Además, debemos asegurarnos de que las nuevas reglas se apliquen a los proyectos de REDD+ existentes, lo cual será necesario cuando estos necesiten actualizar sus líneas base.

Tal como lo indicamos en nuestra conferencia de prensa, el nuevo enfoque para establecer líneas base (a partir de Niveles de Referencia de Emisiones Forestales, NREF) es una forma diferente de asegurarnos de que ello ocurra, pero no significa que el enfoque anterior fuera inherentemente defectuoso. Ciertamente, hay muchos expertos que argumentan que el nivel de precisión requerido para las líneas base jurisdiccionales es mucho más bajo que el que se requiere actualmente utilizando áreas de referencia y, por lo tanto, podría resultar en un reconocimiento insuficiente del grado de amenaza que enfrentan algunos parches particulares de bosque. Además, es importante señalar que el surgimiento del NREF ha permitido la integración de proyectos y esfuerzos jurisdiccionales, en muchos casos por medio de la contabilidad, lo cual creemos que es fundamental para asegurarnos de que nuestro programa respalda los esfuerzos de conservación forestal a largo plazo. Nuevamente, como creadores de estándares, debemos sopesar la evidencia científica y la información que hemos recibido para asegurarnos de que nuestros requisitos conduzcan a la emisión de créditos íntegros y nos lleven hacia un futuro en el que los bosques estén protegidos.

Y sí, podríamos decir que este cambio es comparable con algunos de los desarrollos tecnológicos que hemos experimentado en el audio. Como resultado del progreso en esta área, ahora tenemos tecnologías como archivos mp3 y radios satelitales. Sin embargo, todavía existen archivos análogos que producen un sonido de excelente calidad, aunque no sean tan simples de almacenar y no se compartan tan fácilmente como aquellos en formatos electrónicos. Pero solo porque la mayoría de nosotros dependamos de los formatos electrónicos para escuchar música, no se descarta el valor de los discos. Al final del día, tanto los formatos electrónicos como los análogos producen música, y tanto los enfoques anteriores como los actuales para establecer las líneas base de proyectos de REDD+ generan reducciones de emisiones reales y permanentes.

Consideren esta respuesta adicional como un argumento basado en nuestros comentarios anteriores que está 100 por ciento alineado con ellos. De ninguna manera nuestra capacidad de respuesta a su pregunta de seguimiento debe interpretarse como una señal de que nuestras preocupaciones u objeciones anteriores se han retirado o se están modificando aquí.

28 de abril de 2021

David Antonioli
Director Ejecutivo

Verra es una organización sin fines de lucro que desarrolla y administra estándares ambientales y sociales. Estos estándares incluyen Verified Carbon Standard (VCS), el programa más grande del mundo para la emisión de créditos de carbono.

Our Work

California Offset Project Registry

The Offset Project Registry (OPR) facilitates the participation of offset projects within the California cap-and-trade program

Learn More >

Plastic Waste Reduction Standard

Plastic Waste Reduction Program The Plastic Waste Reduction Program (Plastic Program) enables robust impact assessment…

Learn More >
Photo: Darren Centofanti

Climate, Community & Biodiversity Standards

Supporting land use projects in addressing climate change, supporting local communities and smallholders and conserving biodiversity

Learn More >